Ja, jag är 22… fast i Sverige är jag 17 år

Med de ensamkommande afghanerna gör sig Sverige redo att skicka hem fler asylsökande än någonsin i modern tid.

Från frontlinjen mot IS i öster till Kabuls attentatskådeplatser och i Panjshirs stillsamma dalgångar mötte Expressens team de närmast berörda.

– Jag förstod att det fanns en del av svenskarna som inte tyckte om oss, säger Zia Muhammadi.

Vår Toyota Corolla skakar oss åt alla håll på den guppiga, torra jordvägen i en av Kabuls västra förstäder. Solen börjar gå ned över de ljusbruna byggnaderna i jord och murbruk. Vi stannar vi framför ett lite finare, nybyggt hus. En ung man med en brottares breda axlar, hazarernas lite snedare ögon och ett blygt leende tar emot oss.

Family is more important than ever

He is dressed in a traditional Afghan long shirt.

– Hello, welcome, says Zia Muhammadi in broken Swedish.

We walk up a flight of stairs to the apartment where his father receives in the salon. It is a worthy man in whitening beard. The father sat hostages of the Taliban, before the family managed to buy him free for a little over three thousand crowns.

Zia began his trip to Sweden in the summer of 2015. He – who sought a safer life – says he is 22 years old, but that he was in Sweden was just over the 17th

– But they treated me pretty well as an old man. It was worse for the younger, says the father.

Zia pours some tea while we get the order of the cameras and notepads.

– Are you 22 years, I ask, after checking the spelling of his name.

– Yes, I’m 22 … but in Sweden I am 17 years old. Seventeen and then some, says Zia, snatches little shoulders and smiles apologetically.

He put the cookies on the saucer.

Zia’s story is as poignant as hundreds of thousands of destinies of our time.

In the summer of 2015 decided Zia to get to Sweden. His father had stopped working in the kakbutik which he ran. The safety and labor in Afghanistan was not good for a young mechanic. Especially not for a Hazar, says Zia.

Hazaras is often Shia and it is common that the trampled by Sunni Pashtuns and Tajiks.

RETURNED VOLUNTARILY WHEN HER MOTHER FELL ILL

Zia’s journey through Iran, Turkey and Europe were costly in both economic and psychological. He saw 25 people die on the road.

But once arrived at the Stockholm train station was the people welcomed him and the other Afghans.

They were so nice. Later I understood that it was part of the Swedes who did not like us, he says.

Life in Sweden was a good life. He was given a room in Kristineberg in Stockholm, studied in high school and trained in the club BK Athens. The training he continued in Kabul, although the club is not as good, he explains.

But the fall of 2016, his mother ill with cancer. Despite all the objections from teachers, adults and friends in Sweden, so decided Zia to return to Kabul, where the family now lives.

Life in Sweden was a good life. He was given a room in Kristineberg in Stockholm, studied in high school and trained in the club BK Athens. The training he continued in Kabul, although the club is not as good, he explains.

But the fall of 2016, his mother ill with cancer. Despite all the objections from teachers, adults and friends in Sweden, so decided Zia to return to Kabul, where the family now lives.

– The family is more important than ever, he says.

Meanwhile, Sweden changed its attitude towards immigrants. The young Afghan had to sign a paper in which he promised not to return to Sweden. In return, he got paid for the trip and a Homecoming at the equivalent of 30 000.

– The money was spent to pay my debts for the trip to Sweden.I still have some debts remain, says Zia Muhammadi. This summer he hopes to resume work as a mechanic.

But one day he would again be able to escape the misery and war Afghanistan to return to Europe.

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